Comentários do Leitor

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Ruzanov Diouf (2018-09-12)


The people sitting in the audience aren't looking at a bunch of other tabs, and they're not liable to click away after two minutes. They've sat there, and they've dedicated some time to listening to what you have to say, so if you can slow down and give them some breathing room, https://www.dailymail.co.uk/femail/article-3548353/You-raped-thought-trust-Disturbing-campaign-warns-high-schoolers-dangers-assaults-college-shocking-fake-acceptance-letters.html then they're going to be able to contemplate what you've said and more easily follow along with what you're talking about. Also, your rate of speech isn't the only thing you can control to make your speech better. You can also employ strategic pauses to highlight certain points.

Now, there's a lot of speeches that I've watched to study to become a better speaker myself, but there's actually a fake one that I really, really like and want to use as an example here, and it's this 2023 TED Talk that the producers of the movie "Prometheus" https://www.huffingtonpost.com/entry/sexual-assault-awareness-campaign-puts-a-dark-twist-on-acceptance-letters_us_571545b8e4b0060ccda40b78 put out as an advertisement for the movie. And in this TED Talk, Guy Pearce's character is talking about cybernetic individuals and basically his ambitions to take over the world, but when I watched this, i thought it was a fantastic piece to study for public speaking, because he employs these pauses so dramatically and so effectively.

So check that video out after you watch this one, and start to learn from it. Now another thing Guy Pearce does amazingly in that video is my second tip, which is to pay attention to your body language. And, this is important for two specific reasons. Number one, https://www.usatoday.com/story/college/2016/04/21/watch-fake-college-acceptance-letters-highlight-sexual-assault/37417101/ your body language forms a large part of the non-verbal communication that compliments the verbal communication of your words. The way you hold yourself, the way you're poised, your posture, the way you move your hands and gesture to highlight certain points. These all go hand-in-hand with the words you're speaking and can help to compliment and drive home those points.

But the other reason is that, the unconscious body language that a lot of inexperienced speakers have is something that can harm you. We have a lot of nervous ticks. For example, when I was an inexperienced speaker just starting out, a lot of things that I would do, I would put my hands in my pockets. I guess that camera's fixed right there, http://time.com/4300008/college-acceptance-letter-ad-campus-sexual-assault/ but I can try to show you, right? I put my hands in and out of my pockets, over and over again while I was speaking, and I would also pace around the stage really distractedly, kind of moving, and I wasn't really consciously pacing and using that to effect, I was just doing it unconsciously.

So these are things that you can control to both not distract your audience, but also to help bolster your points. My third tip is to consciously try to improve your ability to make eye contact with your entire audience. Now one thing rookie speakers do a lot of times is they'll fixate on one section of the audience, and they'll stay there during their entire speech https://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/sexual-consent-ads-1.3810475, because they're nervous. But the problem is, there are people over here, and over here, and your entire audience are the people you are addressing. So you want to make sure you're trying to make eye contact with each and every single person during your speech.



Brazilian Journal of Biomechanics = Revista Brasileira de Biomecânica - - - eISSN: 1518-8191 - - - Bookmark and Share